Archive

Archive for April, 2014

Prof. Johnson Speaks at University of St. Thomas

April 24, 2014 Leave a comment
Lyman Johnson

Prof. Lyman Johnson

On Thursday, April 24, 2014, Washington and Lee Law professor Lyman P.Q. Johnson speaks at University of St. Thomas at an event sponsored by the Veritas Institute.   The conference is part of the “Higher Calling Series” and titled “Business as an Agent for Social Change: Social Entrepreneurship, Benefit Corporation, Curing Poverty“.

Professor Johnson will participate as a panelist in a conversation about social entrepreneurship and Benefit Corporations and the positive social role they play in contemporary society as well as possible unintended consequences such movements can have for business.   Professor Johnson is joined by John McVea, Ph.D. of the University of St. Thomas, Elizabeth Babson of Drinker Biddle and Reath LLP, Haskell Murry of Belmont University and Michael Naughton, Ph.D. of the University of St. Thomas.

 

 

Dean Demleitner Speaks on Legal Education in Boulder, CO

April 18, 2014 Leave a comment
Dean Nora Demleitner

Dean Nora Demleitner

Dean Nora Demleitner speaks this week in Boulder, Colorado at two events.

On Thursday, April 17, 2014, Silicon Flatirons Center at the University of Colorado sponsored “The Future of Law School Innovation“.   Dean Demleitner joined panelists Melissa Hart (University of Colorado Law School), William Henderson (Indiana University) and Michael Moffitt (University of Oregon School of Law) in a discussion titled “Change Management: How Can Law Schools, Law Students, and Employers Develop a New Model.

On Friday, April 18, 2014 at the 2014 Associate Deans’ Conference Dean Demleitner participated in a panel titled “The Many Law School Constituents and the Role of an Associate Dean from the Dean’s Perspective.”  The panel also included Barry Currier (ABA section of Legal Education) and Dean Dan Rodriguez (Northwestern University School of Law).  It was moderated by Dean Kelly Testy of the University of Washington School of Law

$25,000 to Professors Who Inspire: Elizabeth Hurlock Beckman Award Trust Seeks Applicants for 2014

April 18, 2014 Leave a comment

The Elizabeth Hurlock Beckman Award Advisory Committee is currently seeking nominations for the 2014 Beckman Award. The award is given to professors who inspired their former students to achieve greatness. Each recipient will receive a one-time cash award of $25,000. Preference will be given to educators who teach or who taught in the fields of psychology, medicine, or law. In 2013, a quarter of a million dollars was awarded to 10 professors throughout the United States.

Gail McKnight Beckman created the Beckman award to benefit teachers who have inspired their former students to make a difference in their communities. The award is given to current or former academic faculty members who have inspired their former students to “create an organization which has demonstrably conferred a benefit on the community at large.”  Alternatively, academic faculty members must have inspired their former students to “establish on a lasting basis a concept, procedure, or movement of comparable benefit to the community at large.”

The nomination deadline is Tuesday, July 15, 2014. An award ceremonywill be held in the fall in Atlanta , GA.  For more information or to nominate or apply for the award, please visit:

http://www.wellsfargo.com/privatefoundationgrants/beckman

Contact:  grantadministration@wellsfargo.com

 

Categories: announcement, Law Center

Prof. Murchison cited in Center for Public Integrity report

April 17, 2014 Leave a comment
Prof. Brian Murchison

Prof. Brian Murchison

Washington & Lee law professor Brian Murchison’s scholarship is cited in “Breathless and Burdened:  Dying from Black Lung, Buried by Law and Medicine“. The report from the Center for Public Integrity won a Pulizer Prize in the Investigative Reporting category for its detailed analysis of controversial denials of black lung benefits to coal miners.

Professor Murchison’s 2002 article “Due Process, Black Lung, and the Shaping of Administrative Justice” is cited in Part 3 of the investigative series as it chronicles of the case of former coal miner Ted Latusek.

Read more of Professor Murchison’s scholarship here.

Call for Submissions: University of Akron Symposium on Class Actions

April 17, 2014 Leave a comment

SYMPOSIUM ISSUE

UNIVERSITY OF AKRON LAW REVIEW

The Class Action After A Decade of Roberts Court Decisions

The Akron Law Review invites academic papers on the reasoning, dimensions, and possible impacts of one or more of the class action or other multi-party action cases decided by the “Roberts Court” (2005-present) We welcome papers of any length and request submission before September 14, 2014. Publication will occur in spring of 2015.

As the Supreme Court of the United States recognized:

The policy at the very core of the class action mechanism is to overcome the problem that small recoveries do not provide the incentive for any individual to bring a solo action prosecuting his or her rights. A class action solves this problem by aggregating the relatively paltry potential recoveries into something worth someone’s (usually an attorney’s) labor.

Amchem Products, Inc. v. Windsor, 117 S.Ct. 2231, 2246 (1997) (quoting Mace v. Van Ru Credit Corp., 109 F.3d 338, 344 (7th Cir. 1997)). Earlier in 2014, the Court refused to intervene in a class action brought by consumers in “the case of the moldy washing machines” against three large corporations. Sears, Roebuck & Co. v. Butler, 13-430, Whirlpool v. Glazer, 13-431, and BSM Home Appliances v. Cobb, 13-138. Although a victory for consumers, the decision is arguably an anomaly amidst recent pro-business cases restricting plaintiffs’ class certification. See e.g., Comcast v. Berend, 133 S. Ct. 1426 (2013); AT&T Mobility v. Concepcion, 131 S. Ct. 1740 (2011); Wal-Mart v. Dukes, 131 S. Ct. 2541 (2011). Multi-party litigation may well be changing, and the Akron Law Review seeks your contribution to the conversation.

Your contribution to this conversation will be both timely and visible. The Washington and Lee Law Review Rankings ranked the Akron Law Review as a top 55 general, student-edited journal (in combined score based on impact factor and citation). Additionally, Ohio Supreme Court Justices cited the Akron Law Review more times in the past decade than any other journal. See Jared Klaus, Law Reviews: An Undervalued Resource, 26 Ohio Lawyer, May/June 2012, at 28.

 You may submit manuscripts by email or regular mail. To submit by email, please forward a copy of your article in Word format to lawreview@uakron.edu. You may submit a hardcopy to: Justin M. Burns, Editor-in-Chief, Akron Law Review, The University of Akron School of Law, 150 University Avenue, Akron, Ohio 44325. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Justin Burns at jmb349@zips.uakron.edu.

Prof. Jost Publishes in the New England Journal of Medicine

April 15, 2014 Leave a comment
Prof. Tim Jost

Prof. Tim Jost

Washington & Lee law professor Timothy Jost published a new article in the New England Journal of Medicine titled “Obama’s ACA Delays – Breaking the Law or Making it work?” (with S. Lazarus).  The article, published on April 2, 2014, discusses the legality of the Obama administration’s Affordable Care Act implementation delays.

Professor Jost also recently presented on the topic of health policy and the Affordable Care Act at the University of Pennsylvania, Harvard Medical School, Yale University, the National Conference of Insurance Legislators and The National Association of Insurance Commissioners.

Read Professor Jost’s  contributions to Health Affairs Blog for his current analysis of implementing health reform.

Prof. Mark Drumbl Speaks at ALIS Annual Meeting

April 14, 2014 Leave a comment
Prof. Mark Drumbl

Prof. Mark Drumbl

Washington & Lee law professor Mark Drumbl spoke as a panelist at the recent annual meeting of the American Society of International Law.  On Friday, April 11, 2014, Professor Drumbl joined other international criminal law scholars for a discussion entitled “Punishment and Sentencing in International Criminal Law”.

From the program:

International criminal law (ICL) has sought to establish effective mechanisms to hold accountable perpetrators of atrocity crimes and grave breaches of international humanitarian law. ICL sentencing, however, remains under-examined doctrinally, conceptually, and empirically. This panel will address various aspects of ICL sentencing, including an empirical assessment of the sentencing jurisprudence, the relevance and viability of the domestic experience with punishment, and the advancement of new theories and doctrinal frameworks sui generis to international criminal justice.

This is a subject Professor Drumbl explored in his book Atrocity, Punishment and International Law  and continues to address in his scholarship.  Read more of Professor Drumbl’s scholarship here.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 285 other followers