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Profs. Spencer and Shannon Hosting Third-Party Funding Roundtable

November 7, 2013 Leave a comment Go to comments
Prof. Benjamin Spencer

Prof. Benjamin Spencer

On Thursday and Friday, November 7 and 8, the Frances Lewis Law Center at Washington and Lee School of Law is hosting the first-ever Works-in-Progress Roundtable for Third-Party Funding Scholars for scholars who write in the area of third-party funding of litigation and arbitration.

Third-party funding is a phenomenon by which an outside entity financially supports the legal representation of a party’s claim in exchange for the promise of a share of the proceeds if the party recovers any money.  On the defense-side, the funding arrangement typically involves the defendant making payments (similar to an insurance premium) to the funder in exchange for the funder paying the defendant’s legal expenses in the case.

Over the next two days, eight eminent scholars will present works-in-progress and share feedback on wide-ranging and cutting-edge topics in the field of third-party funding.  Here are their names and topics:

- Nora Freeman Engstrom of Stanford Law School: “Lawyer Lending: Costs and Consequences”

- Anthony J. Sebok of the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law: “What Do We Talk About When We Talk About Control?”

- Brian T. Fitzpatrick of Vanderbilt Law School: “Should Third-Party Litigation Financing Come to Class Actions?”

- Manuel A. Gómez of Florida International University College of Law:  “Alternative Litigation Financing Heads South: The Potential for and obstacles to third party funding in Latin America”

- Selvyn Seidel of Fulbrook Capital Management LLC:  “Buying and Selling Claims – Why Not?”

- Maya Steinitz of the University of Iowa College of Law:  “Incorporating Legal Claims”

- Benjamin Spencer of Washington and Lee School of Law: “The Law of Litigation Finance”

- Victoria Shannon of Washington and Lee School of Law: “Optimal Dispute Systems for Third-Party Funding”

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